Brioche 101

If you've never done the brioche stitch before, here's the place to begin. We'll start with just one color so that the stitch becomes a habit!


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Ladderizing (S-024)

Slipped stitches and yarn overs give this scarf texture. Add a self-striping or variegated yarn for interest!

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Easy Looped Scarf (S-023)

This scarf is the perfect way to learn how to knit. It starts slowly and easily, with one repeated (knit) stitch, and then gives a little kick of new skills at the end. (If you're more experienced, it's perfect TV knitting.)

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Myluna (S-022)

This beautiful cowl, made of cables and hidden lace, glows with shape and texture.

You can make it as short and high, long and thin—whatever width and height you desire. Although it looks complex, it is just a matter of a few simple cables, a few yarn overs, and knitting and purling.

Easy directions give you a check-off sheet for each row so that you never lose your place.


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Entrelac 101 (S-021)

Learn to make entrelac with this easy and beautiful cowl. Once you get the technique down, add beads! We show you how.

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Texturation (S-020)

Mini skeins of fingering-weight yarn are so appealing! But what do you do with them? This cowl provides one of the answers.

Texturation combines colors with a pleasing texture to keep the knitting interesting--and to give you a beautiful product.

Part of the fun with this pattern is playing with color combinations. Each cowl you make is a different experience!

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Iron Work (S-019)

Wrought-iron railings have always fascinated me. The people who bend metal into a myriad of gorgeous shapes are true artists. This cowl is inspired by their work.

I used a self-striping yarn for both the foreground and background. It is such fun to watch the design emerge!

This cowl fits fairly closely around the neck; if you wish for it to be longer, be sure to buy extra yarn. You can simply add repeats.

This pattern is easy to follow but does assume that you already know how to do Fair Isle. 

Two colors of Noro Kureyon or Silk Garden are strongly recommended, but use any worsted- or Aran-weight yarn.

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School-Spirit Scarf (S-018)

Team colors tend to be bold, dramatic combinations--gold and green, orange and blue, red and black. Make use of this drama with a super-long (to be super-spirited), happily striped scarf!

This scarf is worked from end to end in long stripes. Because of the garter stitch, the edges do not curl.

If you can cast on, knit, and cast off, you can make this scarf. 

Pick two colors for your school, and enjoy a scarf you will be proud of!

Instructions include multiple gauges--from fingering- to bulky-weight yarn.

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Easiest Shawl (S-017)

This is the easiest shawl possible! It is made with a yarn over at the beginning of the rows, but has 3 variations--one for a deep, narrow triangle; one for a wide, shallow triangle, and one for a narrow v-shape using short rows. All of these shapes are pictured in the photos here, so don’t be confused if the shawls don’t look quite like each other!


The pattern is meant for beginning knitters and explains how to make a yarn over and do the short rows.

Any type of yarn will work.

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Swirling Ruffles (S-016)

Swirling Ruffles is an easy, sweet little scarf that can be made with any yarn. It gives you a picture tutorial on doing short-rows, in case you have never done them before. 

Your gauge or yarn weight actually makes no difference. Heavier yarns will make bigger scarves. Just get a fabric that you like, and knit till it’s the length you please!


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Teaberry Ridge (S-015)

Late autumn: You suddenly feel like taking a Sunday morning walk before breakfast.

With a cup of coffee and a wool shawl to shake off the chill, you begin a leisurely walk down familiar streets, to the edge of town, to Teaberry Ridge.  

There, you wander along the road that touches a neighboring farm. The crops have been harvested, the fields are wide open.  

A small breeze. You pull your shawl just a little tighter and walk the edge of the road, enjoying the radiating warmth of the sun, the crisp sound of weeds underfoot. Winter will come soon, but today is a day of light, contentment, and peace.

This shawl is made with a series of mitered rectangles that are picked up and knit, with no sewing required. 


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Antonym (S-014)

This pattern is a tutorial on double knitting. Knitting across one row, you’ll create what are actually two pieces of stockinette fabric, with their purl sides against each other. You’re using one color on one side, and the other on the other side. But you’re knitting them at the same time instead of separately.

Practicing on this easy scarf will give you the ability to double knit more difficult patterns later.  

Choose either two solid contrasting yarns, or one self-striping yarn and one contrasting solid yarn for your first try. This way you can easily distinguish between your two sides as you go. Choose something that knits at 4.5-5 stitches per inch.

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Jordi (S-013)

This ponchette (or shawl) is made from 4 different sizes of wedges. They are joined with a decorative 3-needle bind- off after they have all been made separately.  

The center-back wedge has 6 colors; the others have one fewer section of color on each wedge. This creates a stair step of color.  

Unlike most shawls, where you are working huge rows by the end and feel as if you are never going to finish, with Jordi you will be doing less and less the further you go!  

Choose fingering-weight yarn in colors that blend, and that move from light on the top to dark on the bottom.

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Jordi





Mitered-Squares Poncho (S-012)

Mitered squares a super-fun to play with! Each time you finish a square, it feels as if you have a whole project under your belt. This poncho is a terrific introduction to making mitered squares.

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Make a Million Shawl (S-011)

This is a shawl that you can use for any yarn—an answer to the question, “What can I make out of this?”

It won't fall too far down in back. It will curve around your shoulders so it will stay on.

It will be easy—a go-anywhere project that you can take to meetings, in the car, in the train, on a plane, on a boat, or wherever else you go.

You will be able to make it with variations so that you will never be bored as you knit. Make it plain with a special yarn--or fancy with beads and ruffles. All the little details are refined and thoughtful.

You will probably make a million of them.

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Alice Bee (S-010)

Beautiful waves of stripes make this cowl a pleasure to knit and a dream to wear. It is designed with an uncomplicated lace pattern, separated into logical sections by stitch markers for ease of keeping track and memorizing the pattern. 

“Jogless-jog” directions are given so that the transition between colors remains relatively straight instead of jumping when knitting in the round. Directions are also given for a scarf or shawl.

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Water Wheel (S-009)

This mobius cowl looks like water running through a water wheel. Garter-stitch bands look as if they slow down the water-like flow of the cables between them. The play of garter and cables creates an undulating edge.

This cowl is not only gorgeous; it also teaches you a number of skills. You can learn how to create simple, reversible cables so that the front and back look the same. (Since it's a mobius, both sides show.) The ends are finished either with Kitchener stitch or simply started and ended to create a scarf. 

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Big, Yummy Cowl (S-008)

Who doesn’t need a big, yummy cowl for the winter? This one is simple—a great beginner project! Use any yarn you prefer; any number of colors; stripe it, make it solid, make it all the colors for all your friends and family—whatever you wish. This pattern teaches a cool little striping technique to make the stripes look beautiful on the purl stitches when adding new colors. It is designed for beginners who may never have done ribbing before.


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Maria and Maude (S-007)

I love Japanese lace patterns. When I found this one, I couldn’t resist. I started designing a cowl, made several of those, and then couldn’t stop and went on to make a full shawl.This pattern contains instructions for a cowl, scarf, or shawl. Your choice! Maria, the cowl, is sized for worsted or Aran weight yarn. It takes about 100 yards. Maude, the scarf or shawl, uses any weight of yarn. A table in the pattern shows how much to buy depending on which yarn you use.

This pattern is dedicated to my late grandmothers, Maria and Maude.


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Miyuki Cowl (S-006)

This beautiful cowl with a Japanese-lace influence gives you layers to keep you warm and gorgeous on those beautiful, snowy mornings. Make it with beads. They’re not only fun and easy to add; they make it extra special.The cowl is designed in three successively smaller tiers so that it lies nicely against the body and keeps the neck warm.

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Little Striped Neck Warmer (S-005L)

This cute little cowl is designed to hug the neck high under a coat. It is not just decorative—it is warm. It is fast to make and is perfect for a gift! No one will ever know how easy it was.You can make it in one of two ways: (1) a seamed version with a decorative bind off that pulls over the head, or (2) a button-band version to keep perfect hair looking perfect!.

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Linen-Stitch Scarf (S-004)

This pretty scarf is as easy as knitting and purling--but gives an interesting texture with no curling! The two sides look different, but both are pretty enough to be the “front” of the scarf. Try it in a self-striping yarn for added enjoyment. This pattern gives options for different widths and yarn weights.  

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Ruffled Shawl (S-003)

This shawl draws its inspiration from Elizabeth Zimmermann’s famous pi-shawl—a shawl based on pi for its increases. (Don’t worry—no math needed for this one.)  Before beginning this project, you should be comfortable using double-pointed needles, working with lightweight yarn, and understanding yarnovers. You need just a bit of patience! We provide a check-off chart for each round to make it a breeze to keep track of where you are.It makes a great take-along project—it’s easy, and, if you use a self-striping sock yarn, particularly fun to see grow. Mix and match yarn. Wear it open, or folded in half.

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No-Fail Lace Scarf (S-002)

Lace can be confusing the first time you try it.This pattern is designed to make it easy. You will easily memorize the pattern, which will soon allow you to knit without looking at the instructions. In between lace panels are several rows of garter stitch. These allow you to rip back easily if you make a mistake. The pattern gives instructions for making the scarf shawl width as well.

This pattern is VERY detailed in its how-to. It tells you…
*
How to read a lace chart.
* Howto understand written lace directions.
* How to make an SSK (and why you should care about it).
* How to knit 2 together.
* How to make a yarn-over and what it should look like.
* How to fix the lace if you make a mistake.
* How to block lace.

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Juliette Cowl (S-001)

This simple little cowl can be thrown over a t-shirt, and you look dressed up with no effort. The seed-stitch pattern is simple to make, and a large needle creates plenty of drape. Any bulky-weight yarn will do--and while you’re at the yarn shop, be sure to look for a few spectacular buttons to complete the look.

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